niallcum:

accidentally typing ‘me’ instead of ‘my’

image

mythology meme:  [3/3] mythical rulers

↳ romulus and remus of alba longa

Twin sons of Mars and Rhea Silvia, they were nursed by a she-wolf as infants and raised by a simple shepherd and his wife. Once they reached adulthood, they helped overthrow the false king of Alba Longa. Rather than press their own claim to the throne, however, they decided to restore the rightful king, and found a new city of their own. A disagreement arose, concerning the location of this new city; the brothers fought and Remus was killed. Romulus founded Rome and brought it glory, but as the years passed he became increasingly autocratic, and in the end either disappeared, ascended to the heavens to become a god in his own right, or was killed by the Senate, depending on the particular version of the myth.

myniallerproblems:

"Don’t throw it." - Glendale, Arizona (September 16, 2014)

Labrinth talks collabing with Zayn x

thecraftychemist:

sciencealert:

Teenager from India invents device that can convert breath to speech: http://bit.ly/1m7yTBo

This is amazing:

Sixteen-year-old Arsh Shah Dilbagi has developed a new technology called ‘TALK’, which is a cheap and portable device to help people who are physically incapable of speaking express themselves. Right now, 1.4 percent of the world’s population has very limited or no speech, due to conditions such as Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), locked-in syndrome (LIS), Encephalopathy (SEM), Parkinson’s disease, and paralysis. So that’s literally a group of people that could match the entire population of Germany, and all of them unable to speak.
Stephen Hawking has a device to help him communicate, but it’s extremely expensive, costing several thousand dollars, and is also quite bulky. What Dilbagi has managed to do is invent a device that achieves the same thing, but can be purchased for just $80.
The way TALK works is that it’s able to translate the user’s breath into electric signals using a special device called a MEMS Microphone. This technology is composed of a pressure-sensitive diaphragm etched directly into a silicon chip, and an amplifying device to increase the sound of the user’s breath.
By expelling two types of breaths into the device, with different intensities and timing, the user is able to spell out words in Morse code. “A microprocessor then interprets the breathes into dots and dashes, converting them into words. The words are then sent to a second microprocessor that synthesises them into voice,” says Whitney Mallett at Motherboard. “The morse code can either be translated into English, or specific commands and phrases. The device features nine different voices varying in age and gender.”

thecraftychemist:

sciencealert:

Teenager from India invents device that can convert breath to speech: http://bit.ly/1m7yTBo

This is amazing:

Sixteen-year-old Arsh Shah Dilbagi has developed a new technology called ‘TALK’, which is a cheap and portable device to help people who are physically incapable of speaking express themselves. Right now, 1.4 percent of the world’s population has very limited or no speech, due to conditions such as Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), locked-in syndrome (LIS), Encephalopathy (SEM), Parkinson’s disease, and paralysis. So that’s literally a group of people that could match the entire population of Germany, and all of them unable to speak.

Stephen Hawking has a device to help him communicate, but it’s extremely expensive, costing several thousand dollars, and is also quite bulky. What Dilbagi has managed to do is invent a device that achieves the same thing, but can be purchased for just $80.

The way TALK works is that it’s able to translate the user’s breath into electric signals using a special device called a MEMS Microphone. This technology is composed of a pressure-sensitive diaphragm etched directly into a silicon chip, and an amplifying device to increase the sound of the user’s breath.

By expelling two types of breaths into the device, with different intensities and timing, the user is able to spell out words in Morse code. “A microprocessor then interprets the breathes into dots and dashes, converting them into words. The words are then sent to a second microprocessor that synthesises them into voice,” says Whitney Mallett at Motherboard. “The morse code can either be translated into English, or specific commands and phrases. The device features nine different voices varying in age and gender.”

fostertheppl:

how many hair styles could harry styles style if harry styles could style hair styles


@JohannahDarling: Missing my Louis! #firsteversportsday xx

@JohannahDarling: Missing my Louis! #firsteversportsday xx

omgzarry:

Harry Styles + Phoenix, AZ (09/16/14)